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Benedictine Sisters of St. Scholatica Monastery
Ministries of the Benedictine Sisters in Boerne

“All guests are to be welcomed as Christ, for he himself will say: I was a stranger and you welcomed me (Matt 25:35). Proper honor must be shown to all.” RB 53.1-2

Sister Mary Rose Goertz, OSB
December 11, 1929 – March 27, 2021

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Hospitality in the time of COVID-19

Benedictines hold as one of their most precious values Hospitality. It is with deep regret and a sense of sadness that we cannot welcome visitors during the pandemic. Our Monastery remains closed to the public.  Click Learn More to read about actions we are taking to protect against the infection and spread of the COVID-19 virus.

Ways to Journey with Us

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Happy Easter Sisters! Hugs sent to you.💝

Happy Easter to all the Sisters. Hugs and prayers!

Happy Easter to all the Sisters, especially my Aunt

Bless all of the Sisters💙

May God grant all of you a blessed Easter! 🙏

Happy Easter

Happy and abundantly blessed Easter season🙏🏽

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A Reflection by Sister Frances Briseño, OSB
Prioress

Easter

The Lord has Risen! Alleluia, Alleluia!

The Benedictine Sisters wish all of you a blessed and peaceful Easter!  May the Risen Savior inject hope in each of your hearts as we continue to live in these unsettling times.

In the midst of the pandemic, and all the struggle and pain that the past year brought us, the word celebrate might not seem appropriate. And yet our heart informs us that the feast of the Lord’s Resurrection trumps this virus, it brings light and hope to the most desperate situations and thus celebrate we must! Light always overcomes the darkness! And so, we prepare to celebrate the feast that brought us salvation. 

Many things in our life have changed as of late and we wait patiently and not so patiently for our normal life to return, but if the wisdom of the masses is even a little bit true, there is no such thing as returning to normal.  We will have to learn to adjust to a new normal. And there it is, the experience of the Resurrection by those who came to the grave early in the morning. Something had changed. They were not expecting this reality.  What was happening? How would they move forward from this? They too had to adjust to a new normal. This new space they found themselves in, this new life without the physical Jesus, but with Jesus nonetheless was unbelievable, serial, and perplexing. In the rare moments when they did see him, his appearance had changed. They didn’t recognize him. Everything was different now. It took them awhile to grasp the truth of it. The Jesus who they had learned to love and trust, the friend who had walked with them in their struggle and in their joys, who taught them about God, who instructed them to witness light and love toward their enemies and their friends was still with them. They couldn’t see him, but their hearts felt him; yes, his presence was with them. How was that possible? They were grieving his loss but rejoicing at the same time by this newfound experience of holy presence. Jesus continued being in their lives and Jesus is in our lives, he walks with us now in this time of struggle. Jesus’ light and love continues to give us hope and consolation. The feast of Easter reminds us of that and thus we must find ways to acknowledge the Jesus who rose from the dead to give us new life and new hope. Both are needed badly these days. 

We are fortunate, as the early disciples were, to spot Jesus now and again. Today we spot Jesus in all those who bring hope and love to those who struggle and those who are dying. We hold our spiritual hands together. We will triumph because we know that nothing is impossible for God. God’s light and our light are intersecting, and this light illuminates the darkness of our present situation. United we are HOPE, COURAGE, COMPASSION, LOVE AND MERCY for our broken and hurting world. Our service hands become God’s hands, our voice becomes God’s voice as we gently comfort and help to heal.

We know that this Easter celebration will again be different because of the continued fight against the virus. We know that there will be fewer participants standing in the dark waiting for the Paschal Candle to pierce the darkness. There will be less people, standing for the Exulted and hear Jesus triumph over death, there will be many who will not be present to listen to our salvation stories. There will be fewer present to experience the baptism of the catechumens and the renewal of our own baptismal promises. But we must find ways to ritualize this moment. Yes, we can follow the liturgy online, but we must also find ways to make this real for ourselves. Our memory of this moment is important. Daniel Groody, in writing about the Resurrection, uses a rather strong metaphor to describe the impact of the empty tomb on those who came early in the morning to the grave. I believe it can be used for this time as well. I want to use it to emphasize that we will celebrate, we must celebrate this powerful ritual in whatever ways possible. We will not let circumstances alter our faith, our belief and our celebration of the truth of what Christ did for us. Groody says, “In this Easter Vigil we celebrate the way God in Jesus goes “thermo-nuclear” on any evil that holds us in bondage to fear”. This is the passion that must drive us this Easter. We will show the world the healing grace of the God who became one of us to lift us from darkness to light, from death to life.

A Reflection by Sister Frances Briseño, OSB
Prioress

Easter

The Lord has Risen! Alleluia, Alleluia!

The Benedictine Sisters wish all of you a blessed and peaceful Easter! May the Risen Savior inject hope in each of your hearts as we continue to live in these unsettling times.

In the midst of the pandemic, and all the struggle and pain that the past year brought us, the word celebrate might not seem appropriate. And yet our heart informs us that the feast of the Lord’s Resurrection trumps this virus, it brings light and hope to the most desperate situations and thus celebrate we must! Light always overcomes the darkness! And so, we prepare to celebrate the feast that brought us salvation.

Many things in our life have changed as of late and we wait patiently and not so patiently for our normal life to return, but if the wisdom of the masses is even a little bit true, there is no such thing as returning to normal. We will have to learn to adjust to a new normal. And there it is, the experience of the Resurrection by those who came to the grave early in the morning. Something had changed. They were not expecting this reality. What was happening? How would they move forward from this? They too had to adjust to a new normal. This new space they found themselves in, this new life without the physical Jesus, but with Jesus nonetheless was unbelievable, serial, and perplexing. In the rare moments when they did see him, his appearance had changed. They didn’t recognize him. Everything was different now. It took them awhile to grasp the truth of it. The Jesus who they had learned to love and trust, the friend who had walked with them in their struggle and in their joys, who taught them about God, who instructed them to witness light and love toward their enemies and their friends was still with them. They couldn’t see him, but their hearts felt him; yes, his presence was with them. How was that possible? They were grieving his loss but rejoicing at the same time by this newfound experience of holy presence. Jesus continued being in their lives and Jesus is in our lives, he walks with us now in this time of struggle. Jesus’ light and love continues to give us hope and consolation. The feast of Easter reminds us of that and thus we must find ways to acknowledge the Jesus who rose from the dead to give us new life and new hope. Both are needed badly these days.

We are fortunate, as the early disciples were, to spot Jesus now and again. Today we spot Jesus in all those who bring hope and love to those who struggle and those who are dying. We hold our spiritual hands together. We will triumph because we know that nothing is impossible for God. God’s light and our light are intersecting, and this light illuminates the darkness of our present situation. United we are HOPE, COURAGE, COMPASSION, LOVE AND MERCY for our broken and hurting world. Our service hands become God’s hands, our voice becomes God’s voice as we gently comfort and help to heal.

We know that this Easter celebration will again be different because of the continued fight against the virus. We know that there will be fewer participants standing in the dark waiting for the Paschal Candle to pierce the darkness. There will be less people, standing for the Exulted and hear Jesus triumph over death, there will be many who will not be present to listen to our salvation stories. There will be fewer present to experience the baptism of the catechumens and the renewal of our own baptismal promises. But we must find ways to ritualize this moment. Yes, we can follow the liturgy online, but we must also find ways to make this real for ourselves. Our memory of this moment is important. Daniel Groody, in writing about the Resurrection, uses a rather strong metaphor to describe the impact of the empty tomb on those who came early in the morning to the grave. I believe it can be used for this time as well. I want to use it to emphasize that we will celebrate, we must celebrate this powerful ritual in whatever ways possible. We will not let circumstances alter our faith, our belief and our celebration of the truth of what Christ did for us. Groody says, “In this Easter Vigil we celebrate the way God in Jesus goes “thermo-nuclear” on any evil that holds us in bondage to fear”. This is the passion that must drive us this Easter. We will show the world the healing grace of the God who became one of us to lift us from darkness to light, from death to life.
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2 weeks ago

Benedictine Sisters of Boerne

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RIP Sr Rose Thank you for all the hospitality you offered through the years!

Sr. Mary Rose, thank you for touching my life so with your gentle spirit. You will be missed. Rest in Peace.🙏❤️

Beautiful service

Susan, you were spot on with your eulogy for Mary Rose. She was such a patient guiding light for all who had any dealings with her. I am truly grateful for having known her. She was special.. Prayers for all the family and the Sisters..

Rest In Peace Sr Mary Rose.

Sincere condolences.

Such a beautiful service. My deepest condolences to Mary Rose's famly, all the Sisters, staff and community that Sr. Mary Rose loved, and loved her, so well. Thank you Mary Anne Oehler and Susan Damon for recordng the service so those who could not be there in person. could be there in spirit.

Beautiful eulogy, Susan,🌺 reflecting Mary Rose's gentle ways, 🌺

Blessings to all Sisters and may Mary Rose rest in Jesus's peace!

RIP sweet Sr. Mary Rose. Thank you for loving us. We lift you in prayer with love, Eloy Saenz and gloria Villanueva+

I love you mary rose ...and thank you for everything you did for me and my family and for always being part of my family....and being a third mother to me and teaching me everything in the kitchen

you will always be special to us and hold a special place in my heart ...I love you

🙏

🌺

❤️

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2 weeks ago

Benedictine Sisters of Boerne

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May she rest in peace!🙏❤

Thanks for being in my corner during my novitiate and for being in my mom's corner at a tough time for her. You are one of the best people I've known. 💜💙

Mary Rose, you were a strong and guiding light to us as Novices back in the 70's. I know we nearly drove you crazy, but you were always there for us. May you rest in peace. Prayers for all of Mary Rose family and for the Sisters.

RIP

Prayers for you all love

Thank you for sharing this with those of us who loved Sister Mary Rose. She was a treasure and I always loved being with her at Omega. I will never forget her loving spirit and kind heart. Blessings to you all.

I love you mary rose and I will miss you so very much and thank you for always being there for me and everything you have done

🙏

Str. Mary Rose, God Bless You, you truly were a light to everyone, you will be missed!

🙏

🙏

Prayers

🙏

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A Reflection by Sister Frances Briseño, OSB
Prioress

Palm Sunday

The Passion of Christ we hear this Sunday is not unlike the experience of many who have been infected and died of Covid-19 and those that mourn their loss. It is a difficult reality to comprehend. Just yesterday I was healthy and today I am fighting for my life, we hear so many say. It is the same shift in emotion as the Gospel of Matthew at the beginning of the Palm Sunday liturgy. There are shouts of “Hosanna to the Son of David! Hosanna in the highest.” The crowd is full of joy and seconds later they say, “Crucify him, crucify him.” Very unsettling and yet very real.

The human condition, often, catches us off guard. Michelle Franci-Donnay, talks about how unsettling the whole reality must have been for those who were closest to Jesus. “Seeing signs that suggested things were not as they had been, or should be, but not
knowing quite what they meant and how it would all come out.” Those with the virus and their families are in the midst of that same reality. Families that love their grandparents, parents, children cannot comfort them. They cannot walk closely with them as they
suffer. They can’t say good-bye. They are left feeling empty and cold. The unknown is maddening! The struggle, the betrayal, the suffering, and the death of Christ was intense last year and will be more intense this year. I think all of us will celebrate the Triduum with a sense of caution. We will celebrate the Triduum with eyes wide open and ears amplified hoping we don’t miss the grace of this moment. Hoping we are
nearing the end of this liminal time.

Donnay continues with this question. “Can I listen to the passion this year, truly present to its reality without mentally racing ahead to the ending?” All of us affected by the virus, but especially the patients, families, doctors, nurses, first responders, cannot race to the end because we don’t know where the end is. There are so many uncertainties.

As we unite our voices and pray for and with those who suffer, let us not forget that Jesus’ sorrow did not end in the grave and neither will ours! The grief will be lifted, and joy will return. We will dance and sing once more! New life will come! The memory of this Easter, however, will live far beyond us. And just as the youngest child in the Jewish household asks: Why is this night different than all other nights? We will ask,
Why was this Easter different than all other Easters?

A Reflection by Sister Frances Briseño, OSB
Prioress

Palm Sunday

The Passion of Christ we hear this Sunday is not unlike the experience of many who have been infected and died of Covid-19 and those that mourn their loss. It is a difficult reality to comprehend. Just yesterday I was healthy and today I am fighting for my life, we hear so many say. It is the same shift in emotion as the Gospel of Matthew at the beginning of the Palm Sunday liturgy. There are shouts of “Hosanna to the Son of David! Hosanna in the highest.” The crowd is full of joy and seconds later they say, “Crucify him, crucify him.” Very unsettling and yet very real.

The human condition, often, catches us off guard. Michelle Franci-Donnay, talks about how unsettling the whole reality must have been for those who were closest to Jesus. “Seeing signs that suggested things were not as they had been, or should be, but not
knowing quite what they meant and how it would all come out.” Those with the virus and their families are in the midst of that same reality. Families that love their grandparents, parents, children cannot comfort them. They cannot walk closely with them as they
suffer. They can’t say good-bye. They are left feeling empty and cold. The unknown is maddening! The struggle, the betrayal, the suffering, and the death of Christ was intense last year and will be more intense this year. I think all of us will celebrate the Triduum with a sense of caution. We will celebrate the Triduum with eyes wide open and ears amplified hoping we don’t miss the grace of this moment. Hoping we are
nearing the end of this liminal time.

Donnay continues with this question. “Can I listen to the passion this year, truly present to its reality without mentally racing ahead to the ending?” All of us affected by the virus, but especially the patients, families, doctors, nurses, first responders, cannot race to the end because we don’t know where the end is. There are so many uncertainties.

As we unite our voices and pray for and with those who suffer, let us not forget that Jesus’ sorrow did not end in the grave and neither will ours! The grief will be lifted, and joy will return. We will dance and sing once more! New life will come! The memory of this Easter, however, will live far beyond us. And just as the youngest child in the Jewish household asks: Why is this night different than all other nights? We will ask,
Why was this Easter different than all other Easters?
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so timely for so many reasons

Visit our website to read our newly published Spring Benedictine Voice newsletter. https://boernebenedictines.org/spring-2021/

Visit our website to read our newly published Spring Benedictine Voice newsletter. boernebenedictines.org/spring-2021/ ... See MoreSee Less

Its a beautiful day! Wed love for you to stop by our Sisters Attic Thrift Shop. We have lots of treasures waiting for you.

It's a beautiful day! We'd love for you to stop by our Sisters' Attic Thrift Shop. We have lots of treasures waiting for you.Come see us for your Easter Shopping! We have a sale going on! ... See MoreSee Less

If you are doing your Spring cleaning on these beautiful Spring days, please keep us in mind! Donations are gratefully accepted. 🙂

If you are doing your Spring cleaning on these beautiful Spring days, please keep us in mind! Donations are gratefully accepted. 🙂Is it time for Spring cleaning? We are accepting donations! We are a charitable organization and will be glad to provide a donation receipt for your tax purposes - just ask! Please call (830) 249-0020 to schedule a time to come by. Thank you. God Bless You! ... See MoreSee Less

The Sisters wish to thank Father Norman Ermis and the St. Peter the Apostle Catholic Church community in Boerne for their generous hearts. After the Pastor and church members heard that the Sisters canceled their annual Spaghetti Dinner Fundraiser, due to the pandemic, they stepped up to help. The Knights of Columbus (K of C), Council #10940, with assistance from the Catholic Daughters of the Americas (CDA) Court #2690, held a meatless spaghetti dinner fundraiser benefitting the Benedictine Sisters on Friday, March 5. Proceeds from the event were presented to Sister Sylvia Ahr, OSB, receiving on behalf of the Sisters, by Barbara Vogt from the CDA, and Sam Roberts, from the Knights of Columbus. The Sisters also received a donation from the parish earlier in the month.  

(Pictured L to R - Barbara Vogt, CDA, Sister Sylvia Ahr, OSB, Sub-Prioress, and Sam Roberts, Grand Knight, K of C)

The Sisters wish to thank Father Norman Ermis and the St. Peter the Apostle Catholic Church community in Boerne for their generous hearts. After the Pastor and church members heard that the Sisters canceled their annual Spaghetti Dinner Fundraiser, due to the pandemic, they stepped up to help. The Knights of Columbus (K of C), Council #10940, with assistance from the Catholic Daughters of the Americas (CDA) Court #2690, held a meatless spaghetti dinner fundraiser benefitting the Benedictine Sisters on Friday, March 5. Proceeds from the event were presented to Sister Sylvia Ahr, OSB, receiving on behalf of the Sisters, by Barbara Vogt from the CDA, and Sam Roberts, from the Knights of Columbus. The Sisters also received a donation from the parish earlier in the month.

(Pictured L to R - Barbara Vogt, CDA, Sister Sylvia Ahr, OSB, Sub-Prioress, and Sam Roberts, Grand Knight, K of C)
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A Reflection by Sister Frances Briseño, OSB
Prioress

Fifth Sunday of Lent
John 12:20-33

As we draw closer to Holy Week, the readings remind us of what is coming. In this reading, Jesus wants us to know that as we look at his death and ours as well, we are not talking about the ending of a life, but about transitioning from the old to the new, from this life to the life eternal that has been promised to us. Jesus tells his disciples that now is the time for the Son of Man to be glorified. He wants his disciples then and now to understand death and resurrection.

As we walk this journey of Lent, a professor at Creighton writes “are we willing to be like garden seeds and risk being split apart so that we can renew ourselves and grow into a life rich with abundance to share with others? Are we willing to dedicate ourselves to growing our faith and our relationship with Christ so that we may become the Christians God wants us to be? Equally as important, are we willing to let the world’s greatest gardener nurture us, not by sun and water, but by His never-ending love and his promise to us each and every day?”  

I loved this quote because it summarizes our journey through Lent. How do I, how do you answer the questions? Have we allowed God to help us grow deeper in faith? Am I closer to being the person God wants me to be? How has this Lent been different for me? What transformation has happened for me?

May the remainder of your Lenten walk be blessed with moments of awareness and transformation. Together let us glorify our God for what God has done for us and for what God asks of us!

A Reflection by Sister Frances Briseño, OSB
Prioress

Fifth Sunday of Lent
John 12:20-33

As we draw closer to Holy Week, the readings remind us of what is coming. In this reading, Jesus wants us to know that as we look at his death and ours as well, we are not talking about the ending of a life, but about transitioning from the old to the new, from this life to the life eternal that has been promised to us. Jesus tells his disciples that now is the time for the Son of Man to be glorified. He wants his disciples then and now to understand death and resurrection.

As we walk this journey of Lent, a professor at Creighton writes “are we willing to be like garden seeds and risk being split apart so that we can renew ourselves and grow into a life rich with abundance to share with others? Are we willing to dedicate ourselves to growing our faith and our relationship with Christ so that we may become the Christians God wants us to be? Equally as important, are we willing to let the world’s greatest gardener nurture us, not by sun and water, but by His never-ending love and his promise to us each and every day?”

I loved this quote because it summarizes our journey through Lent. How do I, how do you answer the questions? Have we allowed God to help us grow deeper in faith? Am I closer to being the person God wants me to be? How has this Lent been different for me? What transformation has happened for me?

May the remainder of your Lenten walk be blessed with moments of awareness and transformation. Together let us glorify our God for what God has done for us and for what God asks of us!
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Blessings to you from the Benedictine Sisters on this Feast Day of St. Benedict!

Blessings to you from the Benedictine Sisters on this Feast Day of St. Benedict! ... See MoreSee Less

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Happy Feast day Bendictine Sisters of Boerne. You are all a true example of the Benedictine rule of Hospitality, welcoming so many of us who have passed through your gates for an ACTS retreat. May your ministries continue to bless our communities and yours

Spring!

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Full of many blessings and surprises!!!

A Reflection by Sister Frances Briseño, OSB
Prioress

Fourth Sunday of Lent
John 3:14-21

In order to understand today’s section of this Gospel, one must read the entire gospel.  In this chapter of John, we find Nicodemus, a Jewish leader, coming to Jesus for spiritual direction in the middle of the night. Nicodemus wants to understand Jesus and his message. Why did he come at night? Was that a way of Mark telling us that Nicodemus was in the dark and wanted Jesus to shed some light on his many questions? Was Nicodemus afraid someone might see him? Regardless, Nicodemus came to the source for answers.   

Jesus says to Nicodemus “Very truly I tell you, no one can see the kingdom of God unless they are born again. “How can someone be born when they are old?” Nicodemus asked. “Surely they cannot enter a second time into their mother’s womb to be born!”
Jesus answered, “Very truly I tell you, no one can enter the kingdom of God unless they are born of water and the Spirit. Flesh gives birth to flesh, but the Spirit gives birth to spirit. 

Through this encounter, Jesus invites Nicodemus to begin anew. Jesus invites him to baptism. To leave his opinions, and certainties behind and try to see with new eyes.  Jesus invites him to new life! Jesus says the same thing in his encounters with the Samaritan woman, the blind man and Lazarus in the cycle A readings. Jesus promises new life, a second chance, a starting over experience!

We receive the same invitation every Lent. Those preparing to be baptized receive this invitation. God never gives up on us.

“For God so loved the world that he gave his only son, so that everyone who believes in him might not perish but might have eternal life. Whoever lives the truth comes to the light, so that his works may be clearly seen as done by God”.

A Reflection by Sister Frances Briseño, OSB
Prioress

Fourth Sunday of Lent
John 3:14-21

In order to understand today’s section of this Gospel, one must read the entire gospel. In this chapter of John, we find Nicodemus, a Jewish leader, coming to Jesus for spiritual direction in the middle of the night. Nicodemus wants to understand Jesus and his message. Why did he come at night? Was that a way of Mark telling us that Nicodemus was in the dark and wanted Jesus to shed some light on his many questions? Was Nicodemus afraid someone might see him? Regardless, Nicodemus came to the source for answers.

Jesus says to Nicodemus “Very truly I tell you, no one can see the kingdom of God unless they are born again. “How can someone be born when they are old?” Nicodemus asked. “Surely they cannot enter a second time into their mother’s womb to be born!”
Jesus answered, “Very truly I tell you, no one can enter the kingdom of God unless they are born of water and the Spirit. Flesh gives birth to flesh, but the Spirit gives birth to spirit.

Through this encounter, Jesus invites Nicodemus to begin anew. Jesus invites him to baptism. To leave his opinions, and certainties behind and try to see with new eyes. Jesus invites him to new life! Jesus says the same thing in his encounters with the Samaritan woman, the blind man and Lazarus in the cycle A readings. Jesus promises new life, a second chance, a starting over experience!

We receive the same invitation every Lent. Those preparing to be baptized receive this invitation. God never gives up on us.

“For God so loved the world that he gave his only son, so that everyone who believes in him might not perish but might have eternal life. Whoever lives the truth comes to the light, so that his works may be clearly seen as done by God”.
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WE LOVE AND SUPPORT SISTER BRISENO AND ALL THE BENEDICTINE SISTERS OF BOERNE.

Fifty-two weeks a year women religious stand with the poor and immigrants, teach children, fight injustice, heal the sick, share spirituality, empower women, defend the planet, promote peace, create community, offer hope.
WE LOVE OUR SISTERS! 💜 HAPPY CATHOLIC SISTERS WEEK!

Fifty-two weeks a year women religious stand with the poor and immigrants, teach children, fight injustice, heal the sick, share spirituality, empower women, defend the planet, promote peace, create community, offer hope.
WE LOVE OUR SISTERS! 💜 HAPPY CATHOLIC SISTERS WEEK!
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Sisters recently wrote cards and printed scripture (in English and Spanish) to share with local nursing home residents, to hang on their walls, brighten their days, and bring comfort during the pandemic.

Sisters recently wrote cards and printed scripture (in English and Spanish) to share with local nursing home residents, to hang on their walls, brighten their days, and bring comfort during the pandemic. ... See MoreSee Less

Our Sisters love to keep in touch with friends, family, and those in need, especially during the pandemic, when visits arent possible.

Our Sisters love to keep in touch with friends, family, and those in need, especially during the pandemic, when visits aren't possible. ... See MoreSee Less

We, the Benedictine Sisters of Boerne, are called to seek God in community and to respond in ministry through sharing our spirituality and addressing the needs of the people we serve, especially the poor.

We, the Benedictine Sisters of Boerne, are called to seek God in community and to respond in ministry through sharing our spirituality and addressing the needs of the people we serve, especially the poor. ... See MoreSee Less

There are many blessings to be given, and received... 🙏

There are many blessings to be given, and received... 🙏 ... See MoreSee Less

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The bebdictibe sisters have been a blessing to so many of us through their retreat center. Omega Retreat center has been the place of so may ACTS retreats where God has touched many lives. Thank you sisters for the many ministeries you have begun and continue .

Join us in celebrating our Sisters!

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Its Catholic Sisters Week!

It's Catholic Sisters Week! ... See MoreSee Less

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