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Outdoor Chapel
Benedictine Sisters of St. Scholatica Monastery
Ministries of the Benedictine Sisters in Boerne

“All guests are to be welcomed as Christ, for he himself will say: I was a stranger and you welcomed me (Matt 25:35). Proper honor must be shown to all.” RB 53.1-2

Hospitality in the time of COVID-19

Benedictines hold as one of their most precious values Hospitality. It is with deep regret and a sense of sadness that we cannot welcome visitors during the pandemic. Our Monastery remains closed to the public.

Click Learn More to read about actions we are taking to protect against the infection and spread of the COVID-19 virus.

Ways to Journey with Us

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We have received our first COVID-19 vaccinations and we are so grateful! ... See MoreSee Less

Happy New Year from the Benedictine Sisters!

Happy New Year from the Benedictine Sisters! ... See MoreSee Less

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New year

HAPPY NEW YEAR TO ALL OF YOU AND GOD BLESS, MARY AND RICHARD...

Happy blessed new year to you!

Christmas Blessings from the Benedictine Sisters!

Christmas Blessings from the Benedictine Sisters! ... See MoreSee Less

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Merry Christmas 🎅

Merry Christmas Sisters!

Christmas blessings to all of you

Merry Christmas!! 🎄🎁

Merry Christmas to my sisters in Christ. ❤️

Merry Christmas🎄

Merry Christmas!!

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The Sisters Attic is open today for your last minute shopping! And well be closed tomorrow through Christmas and the New Year. Well re-open January 5th, 2021. God Bless You!

The Sisters' Attic is open today for your last minute shopping! And we'll be closed tomorrow through Christmas and the New Year. We'll re-open January 5th, 2021. God Bless You! ... See MoreSee Less

Christmas Message
2020

The Benedictine Sisters want to wish all our family, friends, benefactors, and Oblates a blessed and joyous Christmas and a happy and hopeful New Year.

As we celebrate Christmas this year, we find ourselves in a very different space. 2020 has been a hard year for most of us. Many hearts are not feeling the spirit of joy as Christmas approaches. Many of us have lost loved ones this year. Sadness, grief, frustration, are but a few of the emotions that weigh us down.

This year God invites us to remember that we are all brothers and sisters who inhabit this earth. God invites us to reach out beyond ourselves and make choices that will be for the good of all. God asks us to turn from selfishness to compassion and reach out with an abundant love and care for all God’s creation. This year we need to decide whether we will see our family or stay home for the greater good of our brothers and sisters throughout our world. Some of us might consider gathering in small groups.  Some of us will celebrate alone. Some of us might not celebrate at all because of the death of a loved one or because we are a front-line worker or because we have COVID-19. We might not gather to celebrate because we have lost our job.  

Although we enter this holiday with a mix of emotions, we must not forget the enormity of this feast. God breaking into our world; the Incarnation. The power of love wrapped in swaddling clothes! God with us! God becomes fully immersed with us and with our messiness. Hope and love are birthed! 

Although our journey toward Christmas has been difficult, hope and love have carried us to this moment. God has walked every step of 2020 with us. We have experienced the darkness, but are we also aware of the light. There here have been many blessings in 2020 – God’s hope on display. God with us. Think of the number of people who have gone out of their way to help those in most need during this pandemic especially, but not limited to our front-line workers. Think of the creative energy that has been on display with artists, young people, old people, all people finding ways to connect.

Think of the many virtual platforms created to lift spirits. Think of the millions of dollars raised to help feed our brothers and sisters. Although, the food lines have been imaginable, so have the number of volunteers helping to feed the hungry! We rejoice these days and we are so grateful for the creative and professional minds that came together throughout our world, worked with enormous energy and purpose to deliver vaccines that will inoculate millions. Our “best selves” showed up in 2020, and radiated God’s love to those that suffer. We have brought hope where none was before. God with us every step of the way. We have been the bearers of glad tidings for others. “We are God’s companions in healing the world, one act at a time.”(Bruce Epperly)  May we bring the healing touch of God to those that hurt and may we help to transform the woundedness of 2020 into windows of grace for 2021.

Our prayer for you is that as you light candles during this season and illumine your home with Christmas lights you may remember the light of Christ is always with us. May you feel the spark of divinity that shines brightly and resides within you.   

We light the candle of joy.
A candle to celebrate light in darkness,
Love that overcomes fear,
Joy that heals sorrow,
Faith that outlasts the machinations of 
Power brokers and despots,
Hope that awakens us to new possibilities.
We light a candle of joy
For this present moment
When God is with us
And we share the light of God’s love
Here and everywhere.
We light it with Mary and Elizabeth, 
And Joseph, Jesus, and John the Baptist, 
And light-bearers in all times and places,
As we open to God’s love being born in us.
   Bruce Epperly

Christmas Message
2020

The Benedictine Sisters want to wish all our family, friends, benefactors, and Oblates a blessed and joyous Christmas and a happy and hopeful New Year.

As we celebrate Christmas this year, we find ourselves in a very different space. 2020 has been a hard year for most of us. Many hearts are not feeling the spirit of joy as Christmas approaches. Many of us have lost loved ones this year. Sadness, grief, frustration, are but a few of the emotions that weigh us down.

This year God invites us to remember that we are all brothers and sisters who inhabit this earth. God invites us to reach out beyond ourselves and make choices that will be for the good of all. God asks us to turn from selfishness to compassion and reach out with an abundant love and care for all God’s creation. This year we need to decide whether we will see our family or stay home for the greater good of our brothers and sisters throughout our world. Some of us might consider gathering in small groups. Some of us will celebrate alone. Some of us might not celebrate at all because of the death of a loved one or because we are a front-line worker or because we have COVID-19. We might not gather to celebrate because we have lost our job.

Although we enter this holiday with a mix of emotions, we must not forget the enormity of this feast. God breaking into our world; the Incarnation. The power of love wrapped in swaddling clothes! God with us! God becomes fully immersed with us and with our messiness. Hope and love are birthed!

Although our journey toward Christmas has been difficult, hope and love have carried us to this moment. God has walked every step of 2020 with us. We have experienced the darkness, but are we also aware of the light. There here have been many blessings in 2020 – God’s hope on display. God with us. Think of the number of people who have gone out of their way to help those in most need during this pandemic especially, but not limited to our front-line workers. Think of the creative energy that has been on display with artists, young people, old people, all people finding ways to connect.

Think of the many virtual platforms created to lift spirits. Think of the millions of dollars raised to help feed our brothers and sisters. Although, the food lines have been imaginable, so have the number of volunteers helping to feed the hungry! We rejoice these days and we are so grateful for the creative and professional minds that came together throughout our world, worked with enormous energy and purpose to deliver vaccines that will inoculate millions. Our “best selves” showed up in 2020, and radiated God’s love to those that suffer. We have brought hope where none was before. God with us every step of the way. We have been the bearers of glad tidings for others. “We are God’s companions in healing the world, one act at a time.”(Bruce Epperly) May we bring the healing touch of God to those that hurt and may we help to transform the woundedness of 2020 into windows of grace for 2021.

Our prayer for you is that as you light candles during this season and illumine your home with Christmas lights you may remember the light of Christ is always with us. May you feel the spark of divinity that shines brightly and resides within you.

We light the candle of joy.
A candle to celebrate light in darkness,
Love that overcomes fear,
Joy that heals sorrow,
Faith that outlasts the machinations of
Power brokers and despots,
Hope that awakens us to new possibilities.
We light a candle of joy
For this present moment
When God is with us
And we share the light of God’s love
Here and everywhere.
We light it with Mary and Elizabeth,
And Joseph, Jesus, and John the Baptist,
And light-bearers in all times and places,
As we open to God’s love being born in us.
Bruce Epperly
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Merry Christmas and Peace!

Merry Christ too all our Sisters .From Gil & Ruby Romo and family.

Fourth Sunday of Advent
A Reflection by Sister Frances Briseño, OSB
Prioress

Our spiritual wombs full, our hearts expanding with love as we birth something new!

Samuel 7:1,8b-12,14a,16 – Romans 16:25-27 – Luke 1:26-38

In the Gospel this Sunday, we see the radical transformation which occurred that gives us our Christmas hope! Alyce McKenzie sums it up like this, “In only three short verses, from peasant girl to prophet, from Mary to mother of God, from to denial to discipleship. In a very real way, this is the appropriate transition from Advent to Christmas. Mary’s story moves us all from who we think we are to what God has called us to be, from observant believer to confessing apostle. Moreover, remarkably, impossibly, Mary’s story demands that we acknowledge the very transformation of God. It is no small journey to go from our comfortable perceptions of God to God in the manger, vulnerable, helpless, dependent. Yet, this is the promise of Christmas”.

“I am the handmaid of the Lord. May it be done to me according to your word.” Luke is the only evangelist who allows us a peek into Mary’s young life. As we read this part of scripture, we can only imagine the struggle of mind, soul, and body that changed her and transformed her into a radical disciple. Saying yes to discipleship is not an easy task. It is usually accompanied by moments of hardship, some rejection, risk, misunderstanding, judgement, and a variety of other unflattering or hurtful things from those whose eyesight is limited. I have no doubt Mary experienced many of those moments.  We see her ‘yes’ expanding and her discipleship strengthening throughout Jesus’ life.   Her ‘yes’ opens us to the impossible becoming possible.  

I have always wondered how much time passed between the visit from the angel and Mary’s ‘yes’. In scripture we hear that Mary pondered many things in her heart. I would think that this invitation to plunge into the mystery that is God and co-create with God would take some heavy duty pondering and discerning. I’m not sure any of us could make such a commitment within a ten-minute time frame. We hear the angel tell her not to be afraid which means that she was afraid. What do we do when we are afraid that a decision we have to make might not be the best thing for us? Most of us would have some measure of resistance. So did Mary. “How can this be, since I have no relations with a man?” The angel tries to calm her and tells her not to worry because God is in charge and will overshadow her and protect her. The next part of the story seems to move rapidly, but Mary must have needed more convincing because the next line is the angel telling her about Elizabeth, her cousin and the impossible made possible by God. Luke did not include the whole long process of pondering or resistance because in the end Mary said ‘yes’. “I am the handmaid of the Lord. May it be done to me according to your word”. Mary becomes very real for me when I think of her taking time to consider the invitation. She becomes even more real when she makes her journey to visit Elizabeth and see for herself if what the angel said was true. After her ‘yes’, she still needed assurance and sought out Elizabeth! 

There are many times in my life where I have said ‘yes’ to God. I have uttered in my soul, “let it be done to me according to God’s will.” But I must admit that there have been times when it took quite a while to get to my ‘yes’. And even after saying ‘yes’, there are still moments of doubt or anxiety. I think all of us can relate to that. We have a God, however, who waits for us.  We have a God who smiles at our ‘yes’ but gives us the space we need to arrive at it.  

Mary’s ‘yes’ changed her whole life. She birthed Jesus into the world and with that birth came salvation for the world. To what did God invite me this Advent? What will I birth into the world this Christmas? Will my ‘yes’ change me? Will I be transformed?  

May I birth the impossible possibility of God and may it surprise me, change me, and transform me!

Fourth Sunday of Advent
A Reflection by Sister Frances Briseño, OSB
Prioress

Our spiritual wombs full, our hearts expanding with love as we birth something new!

Samuel 7:1,8b-12,14a,16 – Romans 16:25-27 – Luke 1:26-38

In the Gospel this Sunday, we see the radical transformation which occurred that gives us our Christmas hope! Alyce McKenzie sums it up like this, “In only three short verses, from peasant girl to prophet, from Mary to mother of God, from to denial to discipleship. In a very real way, this is the appropriate transition from Advent to Christmas. Mary’s story moves us all from who we think we are to what God has called us to be, from observant believer to confessing apostle. Moreover, remarkably, impossibly, Mary’s story demands that we acknowledge the very transformation of God. It is no small journey to go from our comfortable perceptions of God to God in the manger, vulnerable, helpless, dependent. Yet, this is the promise of Christmas”.

“I am the handmaid of the Lord. May it be done to me according to your word.” Luke is the only evangelist who allows us a peek into Mary’s young life. As we read this part of scripture, we can only imagine the struggle of mind, soul, and body that changed her and transformed her into a radical disciple. Saying yes to discipleship is not an easy task. It is usually accompanied by moments of hardship, some rejection, risk, misunderstanding, judgement, and a variety of other unflattering or hurtful things from those whose eyesight is limited. I have no doubt Mary experienced many of those moments. We see her ‘yes’ expanding and her discipleship strengthening throughout Jesus’ life. Her ‘yes’ opens us to the impossible becoming possible.

I have always wondered how much time passed between the visit from the angel and Mary’s ‘yes’. In scripture we hear that Mary pondered many things in her heart. I would think that this invitation to plunge into the mystery that is God and co-create with God would take some heavy duty pondering and discerning. I’m not sure any of us could make such a commitment within a ten-minute time frame. We hear the angel tell her not to be afraid which means that she was afraid. What do we do when we are afraid that a decision we have to make might not be the best thing for us? Most of us would have some measure of resistance. So did Mary. “How can this be, since I have no relations with a man?” The angel tries to calm her and tells her not to worry because God is in charge and will overshadow her and protect her. The next part of the story seems to move rapidly, but Mary must have needed more convincing because the next line is the angel telling her about Elizabeth, her cousin and the impossible made possible by God. Luke did not include the whole long process of pondering or resistance because in the end Mary said ‘yes’. “I am the handmaid of the Lord. May it be done to me according to your word”. Mary becomes very real for me when I think of her taking time to consider the invitation. She becomes even more real when she makes her journey to visit Elizabeth and see for herself if what the angel said was true. After her ‘yes’, she still needed assurance and sought out Elizabeth!

There are many times in my life where I have said ‘yes’ to God. I have uttered in my soul, “let it be done to me according to God’s will.” But I must admit that there have been times when it took quite a while to get to my ‘yes’. And even after saying ‘yes’, there are still moments of doubt or anxiety. I think all of us can relate to that. We have a God, however, who waits for us. We have a God who smiles at our ‘yes’ but gives us the space we need to arrive at it.

Mary’s ‘yes’ changed her whole life. She birthed Jesus into the world and with that birth came salvation for the world. To what did God invite me this Advent? What will I birth into the world this Christmas? Will my ‘yes’ change me? Will I be transformed?

May I birth the impossible possibility of God and may it surprise me, change me, and transform me!
... See MoreSee Less

Looking for some holiday gifts or decorations? Come see us! 
https://boernebenedictines.org/wp-content/uploads/2020/11/Sisters-Attic-Christmas-Flyer.pdf

Looking for some holiday gifts or decorations? Come see us!
boernebenedictines.org/wp-content/uploads/2020/11/Sisters-Attic-Christmas-Flyer.pdf
... See MoreSee Less

Third Sunday of Advent
Gaudete Sunday
A Reflection by Sister Frances Briesño, OSB
Prioress

Advent, a time of Rejoicing!

Isaiah 61:1-2a, 10-11 – 1 Thessalonians 5: 16-24 – John 1:6-8, 19-28

From the entrance antiphon, “Rejoice in the Lord always; again I say, rejoice”, to the opening prayer, to the readings, to the festive pink candle and vestments, we find the joy of this season creeping in. This is what hope feels like. 

“The Spirit of the Lord God is upon me because the Lord has anointed me; and sent me to bring glad tidings. Rejoice always, pray without ceasing and do not quench the Spirit. I am the voice of one crying out in the desert, make straight the way of the Lord”. 

These three statements are taken from each of the three readings for this Sunday. I invite all of you to take a moment and personalize these lines as you read them. For example, The Spirit of the Lord God is upon Frances because the Lord has anointed Frances and sent Frances to bring glad tidings to the poor, the broken, the voiceless and so many others. Personalize each sentence and ponder the impact of the Word on you. This is what hope looks like!  

The Advent season calls us to alertness! To realize that if hope is to be birthed anew, we are the ones giving birth to it! If the people of God are to experience joy during this season no matter how dire things might be, we are the ones providing that joy. If the darkness in people’s lives is to turn to light, we are the light. During Advent, we are that voice that cries out with good news. We are the messengers of hope, love, compassion for the world! There is much cause for rejoicing.

“We are God’s children now”, scripture tells us. Last week we heard that we are equipped with every spiritual gift needed to fulfill God’s mission. We anticipate the miracle of Christmas and we rejoice today because we know deep down that we have been blessed and equipped to give birth anew each year. The Spirit within us is ablaze and ready to assist us with the birthing process! We can birth peace, compassion, love and unity. We are equipped to bring glad tidings to those most in need. As Teresa of Avila reminds us, We are God’s hands, God’s voice, God’s smile!  

Pope Francis tells us, “Our hope is that humanity turns its gaze to God, changes, where we become more generous people and return to a simpler or truer life”. Let this be our hope as well. Let us pray without ceasing that humanity turns its gaze to God. May we birth anew the simplicity that we see in so many of the expressions of the infant Jesus in the stable. May we gaze on the power of love wrapped in swaddling clothes. May we, ourselves, change and become more generous people. Let us together bring the miracle of Christmas to life.

Let us not quench the Spirit that is ablaze within us.

Third Sunday of Advent
Gaudete Sunday
A Reflection by Sister Frances Briesño, OSB
Prioress

Advent, a time of Rejoicing!

Isaiah 61:1-2a, 10-11 – 1 Thessalonians 5: 16-24 – John 1:6-8, 19-28

From the entrance antiphon, “Rejoice in the Lord always; again I say, rejoice”, to the opening prayer, to the readings, to the festive pink candle and vestments, we find the joy of this season creeping in. This is what hope feels like.

“The Spirit of the Lord God is upon me because the Lord has anointed me; and sent me to bring glad tidings. Rejoice always, pray without ceasing and do not quench the Spirit. I am the voice of one crying out in the desert, make straight the way of the Lord”.

These three statements are taken from each of the three readings for this Sunday. I invite all of you to take a moment and personalize these lines as you read them. For example, The Spirit of the Lord God is upon Frances because the Lord has anointed Frances and sent Frances to bring glad tidings to the poor, the broken, the voiceless and so many others. Personalize each sentence and ponder the impact of the Word on you. This is what hope looks like!

The Advent season calls us to alertness! To realize that if hope is to be birthed anew, we are the ones giving birth to it! If the people of God are to experience joy during this season no matter how dire things might be, we are the ones providing that joy. If the darkness in people’s lives is to turn to light, we are the light. During Advent, we are that voice that cries out with good news. We are the messengers of hope, love, compassion for the world! There is much cause for rejoicing.

“We are God’s children now”, scripture tells us. Last week we heard that we are equipped with every spiritual gift needed to fulfill God’s mission. We anticipate the miracle of Christmas and we rejoice today because we know deep down that we have been blessed and equipped to give birth anew each year. The Spirit within us is ablaze and ready to assist us with the birthing process! We can birth peace, compassion, love and unity. We are equipped to bring glad tidings to those most in need. As Teresa of Avila reminds us, We are God’s hands, God’s voice, God’s smile!

Pope Francis tells us, “Our hope is that humanity turns its gaze to God, changes, where we become more generous people and return to a simpler or truer life”. Let this be our hope as well. Let us pray without ceasing that humanity turns its gaze to God. May we birth anew the simplicity that we see in so many of the expressions of the infant Jesus in the stable. May we gaze on the power of love wrapped in swaddling clothes. May we, ourselves, change and become more generous people. Let us together bring the miracle of Christmas to life.

Let us not quench the Spirit that is ablaze within us.
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The Benedictine Sisters of Boerne are celebrating our 109th anniversary of the founding of our community today! We’re glad to share a photo of an Advent Wreath that Sister Angela Arencibia, OSB, made many years ago. She took up making and firing pottery when she was 75 years old. She was an amazing person in so many ways, always willing to learn and adapt. Sister Angela was born in 1901 on the Isle of Pines, Cuba (where the Benedictine Sisters of Boerne were founded on December 7, 1911). Sister Angela lived to be 103 years old and passed away in 2005, in her 84th year of religious profession. 💜

The Benedictine Sisters of Boerne are celebrating our 109th anniversary of the founding of our community today! We’re glad to share a photo of an Advent Wreath that Sister Angela Arencibia, OSB, made many years ago. She took up making and firing pottery when she was 75 years old. She was an amazing person in so many ways, always willing to learn and adapt. Sister Angela was born in 1901 on the Isle of Pines, Cuba (where the Benedictine Sisters of Boerne were founded on December 7, 1911). Sister Angela lived to be 103 years old and passed away in 2005, in her 84th year of religious profession. 💜 ... See MoreSee Less

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Congratulations on your many years of prayerful presence, corporal and spiritual ministries, and prophetic witness. So much to celebrate and to carry into the future.

Congratulations!! Dearly loved Sister Angela!!

Blessings❤️

This is beautiful. Thank you for sharing the story

THANK YOU FOR SHARING. MARY AND RICHARD...

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Second Sunday of Advent
A Reflection by Sister Frances Briseño, OSB, Prioress

A Time of Expectant Hope!

Isaiah 40:1-5,9-11 – 2 Peter 3:8-14 – Mark 1:1-8

As I read Isaiah, “Comfort, give comfort to my people. Speak tenderly to Jerusalem. A voice cries out: prepare the way of the Lord! Make straight in the wasteland a highway for our God! Like a shepherd he feeds his flock; in his arms he gathers the lambs carrying them in his bosom and leading the ewes with care”, I breathe a sigh of relief. A sense of calm settles in my soul. I am able to release the anxiousness of these past few months. I can’t help but think of warm memories of my mother embracing me close to her chest and telling me everything is going to be okay. This is what Advent hope looks like. The tenderness of God is in full display in this reading. God’s love and affection for us is described in beautiful imagery. God holding each of us close and telling us it is going to be okay.

In the Gospel, John the Baptist is that voice that cries out and prepares the way for the one who is to come, the one who is greater than he and will make all things new!  

Prepare a place in your heart for God! Open that space for the miracle that is Christmas, God breaking into the World and the light shattering the darkness. “In the beginning was the Word, and the Word was with God and the Word was God. And the Word became flesh and made a dwelling among us, and we saw the glory full of grace and truth”. John 1:1,4 Advent prepares us to celebrate this wondrous miracle. And celebrate we must because we need to feel that presence of love, compassion, tenderness in our own hearts in order to be God’s presence to those most in need especially now with the pandemic, the division in our country, and the need to embrace all as our sisters and brothers!  

Fr. Ron Rolheiser writes, “I’ve never been happy with some of my activist friends who send out Christmas cards with messages like: May the Peace of Christ Disturb You!  Can’t we have one day a year to be happy and celebrate without having our already unhappy selves shaken with more guilt? Isn’t Christmas a time when we can enjoy being children again? Moreover, as Karl Rahner once said, isn’t Christmas a time when God gives us permission to be happy? So why not?”  

Let us pray and walk this time of Advent with peace and hope in our hearts. May we spend Christmas day, aware of our tender and loving God who breaks into our world and changes the trajectory of our lives. Our loving and tender God who holds us close and tells us everything will be okay. Let us prepare our hearts to absorb that miracle and sit in gratitude with joy in our hearts!

Second Sunday of Advent
A Reflection by Sister Frances Briseño, OSB, Prioress

A Time of Expectant Hope!

Isaiah 40:1-5,9-11 – 2 Peter 3:8-14 – Mark 1:1-8

As I read Isaiah, “Comfort, give comfort to my people. Speak tenderly to Jerusalem. A voice cries out: prepare the way of the Lord! Make straight in the wasteland a highway for our God! Like a shepherd he feeds his flock; in his arms he gathers the lambs carrying them in his bosom and leading the ewes with care”, I breathe a sigh of relief. A sense of calm settles in my soul. I am able to release the anxiousness of these past few months. I can’t help but think of warm memories of my mother embracing me close to her chest and telling me everything is going to be okay. This is what Advent hope looks like. The tenderness of God is in full display in this reading. God’s love and affection for us is described in beautiful imagery. God holding each of us close and telling us it is going to be okay.

In the Gospel, John the Baptist is that voice that cries out and prepares the way for the one who is to come, the one who is greater than he and will make all things new!

Prepare a place in your heart for God! Open that space for the miracle that is Christmas, God breaking into the World and the light shattering the darkness. “In the beginning was the Word, and the Word was with God and the Word was God. And the Word became flesh and made a dwelling among us, and we saw the glory full of grace and truth”. John 1:1,4 Advent prepares us to celebrate this wondrous miracle. And celebrate we must because we need to feel that presence of love, compassion, tenderness in our own hearts in order to be God’s presence to those most in need especially now with the pandemic, the division in our country, and the need to embrace all as our sisters and brothers!

Fr. Ron Rolheiser writes, “I’ve never been happy with some of my activist friends who send out Christmas cards with messages like: May the Peace of Christ Disturb You! Can’t we have one day a year to be happy and celebrate without having our already unhappy selves shaken with more guilt? Isn’t Christmas a time when we can enjoy being children again? Moreover, as Karl Rahner once said, isn’t Christmas a time when God gives us permission to be happy? So why not?”

Let us pray and walk this time of Advent with peace and hope in our hearts. May we spend Christmas day, aware of our tender and loving God who breaks into our world and changes the trajectory of our lives. Our loving and tender God who holds us close and tells us everything will be okay. Let us prepare our hearts to absorb that miracle and sit in gratitude with joy in our hearts!
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A Reflection for Advent and December 2020 
by Sister Susan Mika, OSB

Normally, we speak about Advent as a time of “waiting” as we approach the Christmas season. We wait and pray and prepare ourselves as we ponder that God sent Jesus to come as a child, to live among us, to minister to many.

It seems that in 2020, we have been “waiting” most of the year. We have been waiting:
•  for an end to the COVID-19 pandemic;
•  for vaccines that will help change the trajectory of the illness;
•  for a return to “normal” life;
•  for a spiritual awareness of what is truly important;
•  for bonding across the world that we are in this together.

When we went into the pandemic quarantine in March, who knew that in December we would be in midst of another spike in cases? We look forward to the holidays of Thanksgiving and Christmas as family celebrations…a time to see and enjoy and catch up with family members. This year, we are called in a different way to reach out. One way would be to write a note (yes, and mail it!) to family/friends. Another way would be to reach out and call someone you might not have spoken to recently. Sending a card might say, I’m thinking of you. All of these actions take time. Time is one thing that we do have during this Advent. We are not going out as much, if at all. Many of our groups and committees are meeting virtually.

Advent is a season where we can use the time to look inward and outward. We work on ourselves – trying to reflect more each day. With the darkness coming already at 5 or 6 o’clock – we could use this a signal to look inward. As we are part of our world, we must look outward. We cannot hide from the many needs of the peoples within our circles of influence, as well as, the cries of the Earth and its inhabitants.

We lift each up, remembering that we are here for each other. Reach out and reach across any divides. Our lives may never go back to what we used to consider “normal” – that is yet to be determined. We can use this waiting/pandemic as a chance to re-image what could be.

A Reflection for Advent and December 2020
by Sister Susan Mika, OSB

Normally, we speak about Advent as a time of “waiting” as we approach the Christmas season. We wait and pray and prepare ourselves as we ponder that God sent Jesus to come as a child, to live among us, to minister to many.

It seems that in 2020, we have been “waiting” most of the year. We have been waiting:
• for an end to the COVID-19 pandemic;
• for vaccines that will help change the trajectory of the illness;
• for a return to “normal” life;
• for a spiritual awareness of what is truly important;
• for bonding across the world that we are in this together.

When we went into the pandemic quarantine in March, who knew that in December we would be in midst of another spike in cases? We look forward to the holidays of Thanksgiving and Christmas as family celebrations…a time to see and enjoy and catch up with family members. This year, we are called in a different way to reach out. One way would be to write a note (yes, and mail it!) to family/friends. Another way would be to reach out and call someone you might not have spoken to recently. Sending a card might say, I’m thinking of you. All of these actions take time. Time is one thing that we do have during this Advent. We are not going out as much, if at all. Many of our groups and committees are meeting virtually.

Advent is a season where we can use the time to look inward and outward. We work on ourselves – trying to reflect more each day. With the darkness coming already at 5 or 6 o’clock – we could use this a signal to look inward. As we are part of our world, we must look outward. We cannot hide from the many needs of the peoples within our circles of influence, as well as, the cries of the Earth and its inhabitants.

We lift each up, remembering that we are here for each other. Reach out and reach across any divides. Our lives may never go back to what we used to consider “normal” – that is yet to be determined. We can use this waiting/pandemic as a chance to re-image what could be.
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First Sunday of Advent
A Reflection by Sister Frances Briseño, OSB, Prioress

Advent is a time of pregnant hope and anticipation.
A time of waiting, a time of expectant hope, a time of joy!
A time to remember and birth anew the love, compassion, mercy, forgiveness, healing that our savior brought into the World. Our spiritual wombs full, our hearts expanding with love at the thought of birthing something new!

Advent this year, however, is so surreal. It is as if we entered this season of waiting last March before Easter! We have been in a long waiting mode. We have been waiting for some light to break through the darkness of the pandemic, the darkness of bitter division in our country, the darkness of racism.

Mark’s admonition in the Gospel for the first Sunday of Advent to be watchful and stay alert seems all too familiar. Isn’t that what we have been hearing from the CDC, from our loved ones, from our parishes, from our Pope? “Be watchful; be alert!  You do not know the time”. Our souls cry out for peace and harmony. We watch and wait for a different reality to be born.

I don’t know about you, but as I have tried to settle into waiting, I find myself restless. I find my soul thirsting for life giving waters, for renewed hope. I want this time of waiting to end! I want respite from the confusion and uncertainty of it all. We moved through this time of waiting with deep, deep divisions. Unrest in our streets, political aggressiveness never seen before, a pandemic that has taken 250,000 lives in our country alone, masks, not enough testing, and the list goes on. I know I am not the only one feeling this way. It seems that the world cries out to God in unison for healing and understanding. Heal our ways, O Lord! Let us be mindful of our need for you. Open our eyes to gaze on you as you gaze on us! Move us Lord from this place of fear, anxiety, anger, doubt, and division to a place of love, unity and peace.

Isaiah’s words in the first reading are so timely as we plead to be rescued from this time of waiting, from this pandemic, from the bitterness of division, from protection of ego to freedom of spirit, from darkness to light. Deliver us from such falsehood to the fullness of your light. Help us walk as children of the light. 

In Paul’s letter to the Corinthians, we are reminded that we possess every spiritual gift needed at this time in history to walk as children of the light. The choice is ours to make. Help us, Lord, to choose life! Help us turn our hearts toward the light and to come to a place where we find kinship with all our brothers and sisters.

And through all this waiting in turmoil, we enter a new liturgical year where we can begin all over again. Advent is indeed a time of renewed hope. It is a time of anticipation and fulfillment! It is a time when the star shines brightly, and the Savior is born. The words of O Holy Night, “long lay the world in sin and error pining, till he appeared and the soul felt its worth” come to mind. I remember Fr. Greg Boyle pointing this line out to a room filled with people. My soul leaped and I felt full! How many times had I sung this song and never took note of this powerful line? It is true. What a moment of grace that was. Advent is a time that prepares us for that kind of grace, reminds us of the mystery that is God. Be watchful and alert for we know not the time when God will snatch us from the ordinary into the extraordinary. We know not the time when God moves us to a different reality. We wait for God during Advent, God appears, and we are changed.

“A thrill of hope the weary world rejoices. For yonder breaks a new and glorious morn!” Our souls feel their worth and the new begins to reveal itself.

First Sunday of Advent
A Reflection by Sister Frances Briseño, OSB, Prioress

Advent is a time of pregnant hope and anticipation.
A time of waiting, a time of expectant hope, a time of joy!
A time to remember and birth anew the love, compassion, mercy, forgiveness, healing that our savior brought into the World. Our spiritual wombs full, our hearts expanding with love at the thought of birthing something new!

Advent this year, however, is so surreal. It is as if we entered this season of waiting last March before Easter! We have been in a long waiting mode. We have been waiting for some light to break through the darkness of the pandemic, the darkness of bitter division in our country, the darkness of racism.

Mark’s admonition in the Gospel for the first Sunday of Advent to be watchful and stay alert seems all too familiar. Isn’t that what we have been hearing from the CDC, from our loved ones, from our parishes, from our Pope? “Be watchful; be alert! You do not know the time”. Our souls cry out for peace and harmony. We watch and wait for a different reality to be born.

I don’t know about you, but as I have tried to settle into waiting, I find myself restless. I find my soul thirsting for life giving waters, for renewed hope. I want this time of waiting to end! I want respite from the confusion and uncertainty of it all. We moved through this time of waiting with deep, deep divisions. Unrest in our streets, political aggressiveness never seen before, a pandemic that has taken 250,000 lives in our country alone, masks, not enough testing, and the list goes on. I know I am not the only one feeling this way. It seems that the world cries out to God in unison for healing and understanding. Heal our ways, O Lord! Let us be mindful of our need for you. Open our eyes to gaze on you as you gaze on us! Move us Lord from this place of fear, anxiety, anger, doubt, and division to a place of love, unity and peace.

Isaiah’s words in the first reading are so timely as we plead to be rescued from this time of waiting, from this pandemic, from the bitterness of division, from protection of ego to freedom of spirit, from darkness to light. Deliver us from such falsehood to the fullness of your light. Help us walk as children of the light.

In Paul’s letter to the Corinthians, we are reminded that we possess every spiritual gift needed at this time in history to walk as children of the light. The choice is ours to make. Help us, Lord, to choose life! Help us turn our hearts toward the light and to come to a place where we find kinship with all our brothers and sisters.

And through all this waiting in turmoil, we enter a new liturgical year where we can begin all over again. Advent is indeed a time of renewed hope. It is a time of anticipation and fulfillment! It is a time when the star shines brightly, and the Savior is born. The words of O Holy Night, “long lay the world in sin and error pining, till he appeared and the soul felt its worth” come to mind. I remember Fr. Greg Boyle pointing this line out to a room filled with people. My soul leaped and I felt full! How many times had I sung this song and never took note of this powerful line? It is true. What a moment of grace that was. Advent is a time that prepares us for that kind of grace, reminds us of the mystery that is God. Be watchful and alert for we know not the time when God will snatch us from the ordinary into the extraordinary. We know not the time when God moves us to a different reality. We wait for God during Advent, God appears, and we are changed.

“A thrill of hope the weary world rejoices. For yonder breaks a new and glorious morn!” Our souls feel their worth and the new begins to reveal itself.
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Beautiful words and reflection. Thank you, Sister Francis, for sharing your wisdom.

Thank you, Sr. Frances❣️ wonderful reflection.

Thank you Sr Frances you’re greatly missed!! ❤️❤️

So beautifully written! When I hear O Holy Night it will bring so much more meaning and joy to my heart. Miss you Sister Frances. 😊🙏

Thank you Sister Frances so beautiful. Hope you are well! We miss you🤗

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Thanksgiving Blessings from the Benedictine Sisters!

Thanksgiving Blessings from the Benedictine Sisters! ... See MoreSee Less

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Thank you Happy Thanksgiving to all of ayou Hope all if you have a great day.

Thank you!! Blessings to all of you on this Thanksgiving.

Blessings to all of you!

💜

Thank you!! Happy Thanksgiving! Grateful and blessed!😔🙏🏼❤️. Peace and grace!

Happy blessed thanksgiving to all of you. Thank you for you and your blessings.

Thanksgiving blessings.🧡

Blessings to you all this Thanksgiving day!

May you all have a blessed day also! ❤

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The Benedictine Sisters remember our Veterans.

The Benedictine Sisters remember our Veterans. ... See MoreSee Less

Sharing this Election Day Reflection, On the Pulse of the Morning from the Leadership Conference of Women Religious (LCWR). And, ...let us pray for the soul of our nation and for the strength and courage to recommit our hearts and hands to building a more perfect union.

Sharing this Election Day Reflection, "On the Pulse of the Morning" from the Leadership Conference of Women Religious (LCWR). And, "...let us pray for the soul of our nation and for the strength and courage to recommit our hearts and hands to building a more perfect union." ... See MoreSee Less

The Benedictine Sisters are one of more than 175 congregations of women religious who will be praying for peace for 24 hours on Election Day, November 3, 2020. We invite our Oblates and ALL to join us to pray throughout the day for a peaceful election. https://www.ssndcentralpacific.org/prayers-for-peace

The Benedictine Sisters are one of more than 175 congregations of women religious who will be praying for peace for 24 hours on Election Day, November 3, 2020. We invite our Oblates and ALL to join us to pray throughout the day for a peaceful election. www.ssndcentralpacific.org/prayers-for-peace ... See MoreSee Less

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