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Outdoor Chapel
Benedictine Sisters of St. Scholatica Monastery
Ministries of the Benedictine Sisters in Boerne

“All guests are to be welcomed as Christ, for he himself will say: I was a stranger and you welcomed me (Matt 25:35). Proper honor must be shown to all.” RB 53.1-2

Call for more information about Bethany,
a special Retreat space
830.816.8470

Hospitality in the time of COVID-19

Benedictines hold as one of their most precious values Hospitality. It is with deep regret and a sense of sadness that we cannot welcome visitors during the pandemic. Our Monastery remains closed to the public.  Click Learn More to read about actions we are taking to protect against the infection and spread of the COVID-19 virus.

Ways to Journey with Us

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Looking for bargains on seasonal items? Come see us! All proceeds benefit our Boerne ministries. Were here for your shopping and donating needs.

Looking for bargains on seasonal items? Come see us! All proceeds benefit our Boerne ministries. We're here for your shopping and donating needs. ... See MoreSee Less

Ordinary Time? 
A Reflection for June 2021
By Sister Ursula Herrera, OSB

Here we are, post Easter and Pentecost. Spring is almost over, and summer will soon begin. We are now in ordinary time. But, it is anything but ordinary. To this day we are still dealing with the COVID-19 pandemic, which has paralyzed so many people. Fear of getting sick is keeping folks from ministering to their neighbor. Yet, we just celebrated Pentecost where the disciples gained wisdom and strength to go out and preach the gospel in different languages. It was the Spirit that Jesus had promised to send that guided them forth when fear was keeping them from their ministry. This month we will be hearing Mark’s Gospel to see how Jesus is preparing his disciples, and ultimately us, to do our mission on earth.

The first Sunday of June, Jesus explains that the kingdom of God is like a mustard seed. When the seed is planted, it is the smallest of all seeds. “But, once it is sown, it springs up and becomes the largest of plants and puts forth large branches…” (Mark 4:32) We are a part of this kingdom and should be putting out our branches to provide shade (shelter) to those whom God sends our way.

The second Sunday of June, Jesus is preparing his disciples for the spirit when He met with them in the upper room for the Passover where he ate with them and gave them of Himself saying, “Take it; this is my body.” Then He took a cup and said, “This is my blood of the covenant, which will be shed for many.” (Mark 14: 22-24) By giving of himself, Jesus is preparing the disciples for the work He has set out for them. As we are fed by Jesus, so too, must we go forth to provide food for those in need.

The third Sunday, the disciples were out at sea and fearful of drowning; they called on Jesus who was asleep in the boat. Jesus awoke and calmed the wind and the sea. The disciples “were filled with great awe and said to one another, “Who then is this whom even the wind and sea obey?”  (Mark 4: 41) We too must believe that God will not let us drown. He will be protecting us. We do not go blindly however, but protect ourselves as we go out to do God’s work.

The forth Sunday, the disciples kept seeing the miracles Jesus was performing but they were not totally convinced of his powers and sensitivity. When He asked who had touched him in the midst of a crowd, the disciples were incredulous saying, “You see how the crowd is pressing upon you and yet you ask, ‘who touched me?’” (Mark 5:31) We too, are called to be sensitive to our neighbor’s needs. 

The pandemic has slowed us down in meeting our neighbor’s needs, but it cannot stop us. We now have ways to protect ourselves such as vaccinations, face masks, and social distancing. We cannot let fear stop us from fulfilling our mission on earth. Christ has showed us the way and the Spirit has given us the courage and strength to carry on with our work on earth, especially helping our neighbor. These words take me back to a pastor who came to bring clothing to our asylum seekers. He said the clothes were intended for a church in Eagle Pass, but when they did not respond, he prayed, and God sent him to us. He said, “After all, our neighbor is anyone God places in our path.”

Ordinary Time?
A Reflection for June 2021
By Sister Ursula Herrera, OSB

Here we are, post Easter and Pentecost. Spring is almost over, and summer will soon begin. We are now in ordinary time. But, it is anything but ordinary. To this day we are still dealing with the COVID-19 pandemic, which has paralyzed so many people. Fear of getting sick is keeping folks from ministering to their neighbor. Yet, we just celebrated Pentecost where the disciples gained wisdom and strength to go out and preach the gospel in different languages. It was the Spirit that Jesus had promised to send that guided them forth when fear was keeping them from their ministry. This month we will be hearing Mark’s Gospel to see how Jesus is preparing his disciples, and ultimately us, to do our mission on earth.

The first Sunday of June, Jesus explains that the kingdom of God is like a mustard seed. When the seed is planted, it is the smallest of all seeds. “But, once it is sown, it springs up and becomes the largest of plants and puts forth large branches…” (Mark 4:32) We are a part of this kingdom and should be putting out our branches to provide shade (shelter) to those whom God sends our way.

The second Sunday of June, Jesus is preparing his disciples for the spirit when He met with them in the upper room for the Passover where he ate with them and gave them of Himself saying, “Take it; this is my body.” Then He took a cup and said, “This is my blood of the covenant, which will be shed for many.” (Mark 14: 22-24) By giving of himself, Jesus is preparing the disciples for the work He has set out for them. As we are fed by Jesus, so too, must we go forth to provide food for those in need.

The third Sunday, the disciples were out at sea and fearful of drowning; they called on Jesus who was asleep in the boat. Jesus awoke and calmed the wind and the sea. The disciples “were filled with great awe and said to one another, “Who then is this whom even the wind and sea obey?” (Mark 4: 41) We too must believe that God will not let us drown. He will be protecting us. We do not go blindly however, but protect ourselves as we go out to do God’s work.

The forth Sunday, the disciples kept seeing the miracles Jesus was performing but they were not totally convinced of his powers and sensitivity. When He asked who had touched him in the midst of a crowd, the disciples were incredulous saying, “You see how the crowd is pressing upon you and yet you ask, ‘who touched me?’” (Mark 5:31) We too, are called to be sensitive to our neighbor’s needs.

The pandemic has slowed us down in meeting our neighbor’s needs, but it cannot stop us. We now have ways to protect ourselves such as vaccinations, face masks, and social distancing. We cannot let fear stop us from fulfilling our mission on earth. Christ has showed us the way and the Spirit has given us the courage and strength to carry on with our work on earth, especially helping our neighbor. These words take me back to a pastor who came to bring clothing to our asylum seekers. He said the clothes were intended for a church in Eagle Pass, but when they did not respond, he prayed, and God sent him to us. He said, “After all, our neighbor is anyone God places in our path.”
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Memorial Day 2021

Memorial Day 2021 ... See MoreSee Less

Today is the 19th Annual Nones Ball - A No-Show Event! No one will come, but so many have given generously in support of the Sisters Retirement needs. Theres still time to give. Donations will be accepted through June 30th. To make a secure gift online, please visit our website. https://boernebenedictines.org/nones-ball-2021/ Thank You!

Today is the 19th Annual None's Ball - A No-Show Event! No one will come, but so many have given generously in support of the Sisters' Retirement needs. There's still time to give. Donations will be accepted through June 30th. To make a secure gift online, please visit our website. boernebenedictines.org/nones-ball-2021/ Thank You! ... See MoreSee Less

Our Thrift Shop is open Tuesday - Saturday, 10 am - 4 pm. (Donations accepted 10 am - 2 pm). Details below!

Our Thrift Shop is open Tuesday - Saturday, 10 am - 4 pm. (Donations accepted 10 am - 2 pm). Details below!It's a beautiful day! We'd love for you to come see us. 🙂 ... See MoreSee Less

Congratulations to Sister Susan Mika, OSB! 

You can watch the virtual CTSA Leadership Luncheon event by clicking the link below. 

https://www.facebook.com/catholictvsa/videos/471428300737850/

Congratulations to Sister Susan Mika, OSB!

You can watch the virtual CTSA Leadership Luncheon event by clicking the link below.

2021 CTSA Leadership Luncheon
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Comment on Facebook

Congrats Sr. Susan!

Sincere Congratulations Susan! ❤️ Very Well deserved for all of your hard work and dedication! Love & Hugs! 😘

Congratulations Sister Susan. A honor so well deserved. Love, Gerald and Lady Ellen 🥰

Congratulations Sister Susan! Well Deserved 💕

Congratulations, Sr. Susan!

Wonderful!!! Congratulations Sr. Susan

Congratulations, Sister Susan!

Congratulations Sr Susan!!

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A Reflection for May 2021
By Sister Bernice Lindsey, OSB

When you think of the month of May what comes to mind? What does this month mean to you? May is the 5th month of the year, 25 percent of 2021 has passed.

For me, the month of May signifies the Month of Mary, the Mother of Jesus.

The Ascension on May 13th is the ascent of Jesus Christ into heaven the 40th day after his Resurrection. And May 23rd is Pentecost; this is what I would like to focus on at this time.

Pentecost, the birthday of the Catholic Church. Happy birthday to all of you who are the body of this Church. We are all familiar with our own birthdays, and we celebrate them because they mark the day of the year in which we entered this life. But did you know you have a second birthday?

Because you are part of the body of the Church, Pentecost is the Church’s birthday, and yours as well. And like any birthday, it is a cause for celebration.

The word Pentecost is Greek, and it means “50th day.” Fifty days after Easter Sunday we celebrate the coming of the Holy Spirit upon the Apostles and their followers, and the beginning of their Earthly ministry to make disciples of all nations.

Pentecost is also a Jewish holiday, which the Jews use to celebrate the end of Passover. Jews celebrate the gift of Moses at Mt. Sinai on this day. But we, as Catholics, celebrate the birth of our Church.

At Pentecost, the Apostles and their followers were gathered in a room. Jews from all over the world were gathered with Peter, the leader of the Apostles. At that time, a great wind blew, and a flame appeared as a tongue of fire which split itself into many individual flames above the heads of all those present. The Holy Spirit came upon these people and each began to speak in tongues. Despite the fact many had no common language, they were perfectly able to understand one another.

In our country, and in our world, there are many languages spoken. How do we work to understand others who speak with a different tongue (language)? Do we get angry and feel that they should be speaking our language, or do we, with patience, accept and try to understand? Perhaps we could try to learn their language?

Questions for reflection:

How do you celebrate the birthday of the Catholic Church, or do you?

What is your belief in the Holy Spirit?

Do you call on the Holy Spirit for guidance, support, or help?

A Reflection for May 2021
By Sister Bernice Lindsey, OSB

When you think of the month of May what comes to mind? What does this month mean to you? May is the 5th month of the year, 25 percent of 2021 has passed.

For me, the month of May signifies the Month of Mary, the Mother of Jesus.

The Ascension on May 13th is the ascent of Jesus Christ into heaven the 40th day after his Resurrection. And May 23rd is Pentecost; this is what I would like to focus on at this time.

Pentecost, the birthday of the Catholic Church. Happy birthday to all of you who are the body of this Church. We are all familiar with our own birthdays, and we celebrate them because they mark the day of the year in which we entered this life. But did you know you have a second birthday?

Because you are part of the body of the Church, Pentecost is the Church’s birthday, and yours as well. And like any birthday, it is a cause for celebration.

The word Pentecost is Greek, and it means “50th day.” Fifty days after Easter Sunday we celebrate the coming of the Holy Spirit upon the Apostles and their followers, and the beginning of their Earthly ministry to make disciples of all nations.

Pentecost is also a Jewish holiday, which the Jews use to celebrate the end of Passover. Jews celebrate the gift of Moses at Mt. Sinai on this day. But we, as Catholics, celebrate the birth of our Church.

At Pentecost, the Apostles and their followers were gathered in a room. Jews from all over the world were gathered with Peter, the leader of the Apostles. At that time, a great wind blew, and a flame appeared as a tongue of fire which split itself into many individual flames above the heads of all those present. The Holy Spirit came upon these people and each began to speak in tongues. Despite the fact many had no common language, they were perfectly able to understand one another.

In our country, and in our world, there are many languages spoken. How do we work to understand others who speak with a different tongue (language)? Do we get angry and feel that they should be speaking our language, or do we, with patience, accept and try to understand? Perhaps we could try to learn their language?

Questions for reflection:

How do you celebrate the birthday of the Catholic Church, or do you?

What is your belief in the Holy Spirit?

Do you call on the Holy Spirit for guidance, support, or help?
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Think of us when shopping for the little ones in your life! We have clothing, toys, and other items for infants and children. ... See MoreSee Less

Please continue to keep all of the Sisters in prayer. Thank you.

Please continue to keep all of the Sisters in prayer. Thank you. ... See MoreSee Less

Comment on Facebook

Always. 💜

Prayers for all of you but especially Sr Frances for recovery, and Sr Sylvia adjusting to her new responsibility. 💕

Prayers for Sister Sylvia!🙏🙏🙏🙏🙏

Prayers for Sr.Syliva

🙏🙏🙏🙏🙏🙏

Prayers for Sister Frances for continued healing and for Sister Sylvia in her new position. Prayers for all the Sisters always!!

Prayers ascending!

Blessings to you Sister Sylvia.

BLESSING TO SISTER SYLVIA AND PRAYERS FOR SISTER BRISENO'S RECOVERY. MARY AND RICHARD..........

Prayers for all the Sisters especially for Sr. Francis for a full recovery and for Sr. Sylvia.🙏🏻🙏🏻

I hope all goes well, and prayers for Sister Sylvia 🙏 ❤

Prayer for all of you !! And for a full recovery of Sr Francis

Holding you all in prayer.

I've kept all of you in my prayers daily, and will continue to do so. My love is with you all.

God bless Sister Sylvia! In my prayers.

Prayers for Sr Frances and Sr Sylvia🙏🙏🙏

Praying for Sister Sylvia

Prayers for the Sisters!!!

Mary Estella Vasquez

🙏🏻

Prayers for continued healing for Sister Frances and for Sister Sylvia has she starts her new role. 🙏

Thank you all for your kindness and prayers!

Sr. Frances remains in our prayers 🙏🏼

🙏

We raise you up in prayer and hold you in love

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Were Celebrating Earth Day!

We're Celebrating Earth Day! ... See MoreSee Less

It’s a beautiful day to come visit the Sisters’ Attic Thrift Shop!

It’s a beautiful day to come visit the Sisters’ Attic Thrift Shop!We have lots of beautiful decorative items for your home, and collectables, too! ... See MoreSee Less

Welcome, Marisa Bono! This is exciting news for Every Texan! Every Texan was originally founded by the Benedictine Sisters of Boerne in 1985. The name and the organization have evolved as Every Texan has pursued the vision of a more equitable Texas for over thirty five years.

Welcome, Marisa Bono! This is exciting news for Every Texan! Every Texan was originally founded by the Benedictine Sisters of Boerne in 1985. The name and the organization have evolved as Every Texan has pursued the vision of a more equitable Texas for over thirty five years.Please welcome our new CEO Marisa Bono! We're ready to work on strengthening public policy to create a Texas where everyone has an equal opportunity to thrive.

Read Every Texan’s announcement here: everytexan.org/meet-marisa-bono/
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Sisters' Attic is here for your thrift shopping and non-profit donation needs. ... See MoreSee Less

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Comment on Facebook

Happy Easter Sisters! Hugs sent to you.💝

Happy Easter to all the Sisters. Hugs and prayers!

Happy Easter to all the Sisters, especially my Aunt

Bless all of the Sisters💙

May God grant all of you a blessed Easter! 🙏

Happy Easter

Happy and abundantly blessed Easter season🙏🏽

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A Reflection by Sister Frances Briseño, OSB
Prioress

Easter

The Lord has Risen! Alleluia, Alleluia!

The Benedictine Sisters wish all of you a blessed and peaceful Easter!  May the Risen Savior inject hope in each of your hearts as we continue to live in these unsettling times.

In the midst of the pandemic, and all the struggle and pain that the past year brought us, the word celebrate might not seem appropriate. And yet our heart informs us that the feast of the Lord’s Resurrection trumps this virus, it brings light and hope to the most desperate situations and thus celebrate we must! Light always overcomes the darkness! And so, we prepare to celebrate the feast that brought us salvation. 

Many things in our life have changed as of late and we wait patiently and not so patiently for our normal life to return, but if the wisdom of the masses is even a little bit true, there is no such thing as returning to normal.  We will have to learn to adjust to a new normal. And there it is, the experience of the Resurrection by those who came to the grave early in the morning. Something had changed. They were not expecting this reality.  What was happening? How would they move forward from this? They too had to adjust to a new normal. This new space they found themselves in, this new life without the physical Jesus, but with Jesus nonetheless was unbelievable, serial, and perplexing. In the rare moments when they did see him, his appearance had changed. They didn’t recognize him. Everything was different now. It took them awhile to grasp the truth of it. The Jesus who they had learned to love and trust, the friend who had walked with them in their struggle and in their joys, who taught them about God, who instructed them to witness light and love toward their enemies and their friends was still with them. They couldn’t see him, but their hearts felt him; yes, his presence was with them. How was that possible? They were grieving his loss but rejoicing at the same time by this newfound experience of holy presence. Jesus continued being in their lives and Jesus is in our lives, he walks with us now in this time of struggle. Jesus’ light and love continues to give us hope and consolation. The feast of Easter reminds us of that and thus we must find ways to acknowledge the Jesus who rose from the dead to give us new life and new hope. Both are needed badly these days. 

We are fortunate, as the early disciples were, to spot Jesus now and again. Today we spot Jesus in all those who bring hope and love to those who struggle and those who are dying. We hold our spiritual hands together. We will triumph because we know that nothing is impossible for God. God’s light and our light are intersecting, and this light illuminates the darkness of our present situation. United we are HOPE, COURAGE, COMPASSION, LOVE AND MERCY for our broken and hurting world. Our service hands become God’s hands, our voice becomes God’s voice as we gently comfort and help to heal.

We know that this Easter celebration will again be different because of the continued fight against the virus. We know that there will be fewer participants standing in the dark waiting for the Paschal Candle to pierce the darkness. There will be less people, standing for the Exulted and hear Jesus triumph over death, there will be many who will not be present to listen to our salvation stories. There will be fewer present to experience the baptism of the catechumens and the renewal of our own baptismal promises. But we must find ways to ritualize this moment. Yes, we can follow the liturgy online, but we must also find ways to make this real for ourselves. Our memory of this moment is important. Daniel Groody, in writing about the Resurrection, uses a rather strong metaphor to describe the impact of the empty tomb on those who came early in the morning to the grave. I believe it can be used for this time as well. I want to use it to emphasize that we will celebrate, we must celebrate this powerful ritual in whatever ways possible. We will not let circumstances alter our faith, our belief and our celebration of the truth of what Christ did for us. Groody says, “In this Easter Vigil we celebrate the way God in Jesus goes “thermo-nuclear” on any evil that holds us in bondage to fear”. This is the passion that must drive us this Easter. We will show the world the healing grace of the God who became one of us to lift us from darkness to light, from death to life.

A Reflection by Sister Frances Briseño, OSB
Prioress

Easter

The Lord has Risen! Alleluia, Alleluia!

The Benedictine Sisters wish all of you a blessed and peaceful Easter! May the Risen Savior inject hope in each of your hearts as we continue to live in these unsettling times.

In the midst of the pandemic, and all the struggle and pain that the past year brought us, the word celebrate might not seem appropriate. And yet our heart informs us that the feast of the Lord’s Resurrection trumps this virus, it brings light and hope to the most desperate situations and thus celebrate we must! Light always overcomes the darkness! And so, we prepare to celebrate the feast that brought us salvation.

Many things in our life have changed as of late and we wait patiently and not so patiently for our normal life to return, but if the wisdom of the masses is even a little bit true, there is no such thing as returning to normal. We will have to learn to adjust to a new normal. And there it is, the experience of the Resurrection by those who came to the grave early in the morning. Something had changed. They were not expecting this reality. What was happening? How would they move forward from this? They too had to adjust to a new normal. This new space they found themselves in, this new life without the physical Jesus, but with Jesus nonetheless was unbelievable, serial, and perplexing. In the rare moments when they did see him, his appearance had changed. They didn’t recognize him. Everything was different now. It took them awhile to grasp the truth of it. The Jesus who they had learned to love and trust, the friend who had walked with them in their struggle and in their joys, who taught them about God, who instructed them to witness light and love toward their enemies and their friends was still with them. They couldn’t see him, but their hearts felt him; yes, his presence was with them. How was that possible? They were grieving his loss but rejoicing at the same time by this newfound experience of holy presence. Jesus continued being in their lives and Jesus is in our lives, he walks with us now in this time of struggle. Jesus’ light and love continues to give us hope and consolation. The feast of Easter reminds us of that and thus we must find ways to acknowledge the Jesus who rose from the dead to give us new life and new hope. Both are needed badly these days.

We are fortunate, as the early disciples were, to spot Jesus now and again. Today we spot Jesus in all those who bring hope and love to those who struggle and those who are dying. We hold our spiritual hands together. We will triumph because we know that nothing is impossible for God. God’s light and our light are intersecting, and this light illuminates the darkness of our present situation. United we are HOPE, COURAGE, COMPASSION, LOVE AND MERCY for our broken and hurting world. Our service hands become God’s hands, our voice becomes God’s voice as we gently comfort and help to heal.

We know that this Easter celebration will again be different because of the continued fight against the virus. We know that there will be fewer participants standing in the dark waiting for the Paschal Candle to pierce the darkness. There will be less people, standing for the Exulted and hear Jesus triumph over death, there will be many who will not be present to listen to our salvation stories. There will be fewer present to experience the baptism of the catechumens and the renewal of our own baptismal promises. But we must find ways to ritualize this moment. Yes, we can follow the liturgy online, but we must also find ways to make this real for ourselves. Our memory of this moment is important. Daniel Groody, in writing about the Resurrection, uses a rather strong metaphor to describe the impact of the empty tomb on those who came early in the morning to the grave. I believe it can be used for this time as well. I want to use it to emphasize that we will celebrate, we must celebrate this powerful ritual in whatever ways possible. We will not let circumstances alter our faith, our belief and our celebration of the truth of what Christ did for us. Groody says, “In this Easter Vigil we celebrate the way God in Jesus goes “thermo-nuclear” on any evil that holds us in bondage to fear”. This is the passion that must drive us this Easter. We will show the world the healing grace of the God who became one of us to lift us from darkness to light, from death to life.
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3 months ago

Benedictine Sisters of Boerne

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Comment on Facebook

RIP Sr Rose Thank you for all the hospitality you offered through the years!

Sr. Mary Rose, thank you for touching my life so with your gentle spirit. You will be missed. Rest in Peace.🙏❤️

Beautiful service

Susan, you were spot on with your eulogy for Mary Rose. She was such a patient guiding light for all who had any dealings with her. I am truly grateful for having known her. She was special.. Prayers for all the family and the Sisters..

Rest In Peace Sr Mary Rose.

Sincere condolences.

Such a beautiful service. My deepest condolences to Mary Rose's famly, all the Sisters, staff and community that Sr. Mary Rose loved, and loved her, so well. Thank you Mary Anne Oehler and Susan Damon for recordng the service so those who could not be there in person. could be there in spirit.

Beautiful eulogy, Susan,🌺 reflecting Mary Rose's gentle ways, 🌺

Blessings to all Sisters and may Mary Rose rest in Jesus's peace!

RIP sweet Sr. Mary Rose. Thank you for loving us. We lift you in prayer with love, Eloy Saenz and gloria Villanueva+

I love you mary rose ...and thank you for everything you did for me and my family and for always being part of my family....and being a third mother to me and teaching me everything in the kitchen

you will always be special to us and hold a special place in my heart ...I love you

🙏

🌺

❤️

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3 months ago

Benedictine Sisters of Boerne

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Comment on Facebook

May she rest in peace!🙏❤

Thanks for being in my corner during my novitiate and for being in my mom's corner at a tough time for her. You are one of the best people I've known. 💜💙

Mary Rose, you were a strong and guiding light to us as Novices back in the 70's. I know we nearly drove you crazy, but you were always there for us. May you rest in peace. Prayers for all of Mary Rose family and for the Sisters.

RIP

Prayers for you all love

Thank you for sharing this with those of us who loved Sister Mary Rose. She was a treasure and I always loved being with her at Omega. I will never forget her loving spirit and kind heart. Blessings to you all.

I love you mary rose and I will miss you so very much and thank you for always being there for me and everything you have done

🙏

Str. Mary Rose, God Bless You, you truly were a light to everyone, you will be missed!

🙏

🙏

Prayers

🙏

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A Reflection by Sister Frances Briseño, OSB
Prioress

Palm Sunday

The Passion of Christ we hear this Sunday is not unlike the experience of many who have been infected and died of Covid-19 and those that mourn their loss. It is a difficult reality to comprehend. Just yesterday I was healthy and today I am fighting for my life, we hear so many say. It is the same shift in emotion as the Gospel of Matthew at the beginning of the Palm Sunday liturgy. There are shouts of “Hosanna to the Son of David! Hosanna in the highest.” The crowd is full of joy and seconds later they say, “Crucify him, crucify him.” Very unsettling and yet very real.

The human condition, often, catches us off guard. Michelle Franci-Donnay, talks about how unsettling the whole reality must have been for those who were closest to Jesus. “Seeing signs that suggested things were not as they had been, or should be, but not
knowing quite what they meant and how it would all come out.” Those with the virus and their families are in the midst of that same reality. Families that love their grandparents, parents, children cannot comfort them. They cannot walk closely with them as they
suffer. They can’t say good-bye. They are left feeling empty and cold. The unknown is maddening! The struggle, the betrayal, the suffering, and the death of Christ was intense last year and will be more intense this year. I think all of us will celebrate the Triduum with a sense of caution. We will celebrate the Triduum with eyes wide open and ears amplified hoping we don’t miss the grace of this moment. Hoping we are
nearing the end of this liminal time.

Donnay continues with this question. “Can I listen to the passion this year, truly present to its reality without mentally racing ahead to the ending?” All of us affected by the virus, but especially the patients, families, doctors, nurses, first responders, cannot race to the end because we don’t know where the end is. There are so many uncertainties.

As we unite our voices and pray for and with those who suffer, let us not forget that Jesus’ sorrow did not end in the grave and neither will ours! The grief will be lifted, and joy will return. We will dance and sing once more! New life will come! The memory of this Easter, however, will live far beyond us. And just as the youngest child in the Jewish household asks: Why is this night different than all other nights? We will ask,
Why was this Easter different than all other Easters?

A Reflection by Sister Frances Briseño, OSB
Prioress

Palm Sunday

The Passion of Christ we hear this Sunday is not unlike the experience of many who have been infected and died of Covid-19 and those that mourn their loss. It is a difficult reality to comprehend. Just yesterday I was healthy and today I am fighting for my life, we hear so many say. It is the same shift in emotion as the Gospel of Matthew at the beginning of the Palm Sunday liturgy. There are shouts of “Hosanna to the Son of David! Hosanna in the highest.” The crowd is full of joy and seconds later they say, “Crucify him, crucify him.” Very unsettling and yet very real.

The human condition, often, catches us off guard. Michelle Franci-Donnay, talks about how unsettling the whole reality must have been for those who were closest to Jesus. “Seeing signs that suggested things were not as they had been, or should be, but not
knowing quite what they meant and how it would all come out.” Those with the virus and their families are in the midst of that same reality. Families that love their grandparents, parents, children cannot comfort them. They cannot walk closely with them as they
suffer. They can’t say good-bye. They are left feeling empty and cold. The unknown is maddening! The struggle, the betrayal, the suffering, and the death of Christ was intense last year and will be more intense this year. I think all of us will celebrate the Triduum with a sense of caution. We will celebrate the Triduum with eyes wide open and ears amplified hoping we don’t miss the grace of this moment. Hoping we are
nearing the end of this liminal time.

Donnay continues with this question. “Can I listen to the passion this year, truly present to its reality without mentally racing ahead to the ending?” All of us affected by the virus, but especially the patients, families, doctors, nurses, first responders, cannot race to the end because we don’t know where the end is. There are so many uncertainties.

As we unite our voices and pray for and with those who suffer, let us not forget that Jesus’ sorrow did not end in the grave and neither will ours! The grief will be lifted, and joy will return. We will dance and sing once more! New life will come! The memory of this Easter, however, will live far beyond us. And just as the youngest child in the Jewish household asks: Why is this night different than all other nights? We will ask,
Why was this Easter different than all other Easters?
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so timely for so many reasons

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We are called to seek God in community and to respond in ministry through sharing our spirituality and addressing the needs of the people we serve, especially the poor.

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